Scenarios for you to try

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Andrea Sfiligoi
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Scenarios for you to try

Unread postby Andrea Sfiligoi » Mon Mar 23, 2015 5:44 pm

Here are a few scenarios that will be in the book. the first two are simpler. I am of course more interested in hearing from you testers about the others. I am writing more, if they will not fir in the book I will print them later in Talespinner or have them as free PDFs.


Skirmish
This is the simplest scenario. Players dice to determine attacker and defender. Players alternate placing four to eight scenic items (the defender decides how many) on the tabletop. No scenic feature can be larger than 2 X L across. Scenic features can be adjacent to table edges. There must be at least a 1 X Short gap between any two terrain features. Terrain features should be irregularly shaped.
The attacker chooses a baseline to deploy his troops.
The defender deploys his models within 1 X Short of the opposite baseline, and then the attacker does the same on his baseline. Attacker goes first. Play continues until one player concedes or all models on one side are defeated (routed off the table, out of action. or killed).
Victory conditions: Defeating the opponent while suffering less than 20% losses is a decisive victory. If both warbands are reduced below 50%, the game is a tie. Any other victory is marginal.


Ambush
Set up as Skirmish, above, but the defender places markers instead of placing models. The markers must be of the same size of the models’ bases. The defender places two markers per each model in his warband. If the warband comprises models with different base sizes, the difference in size must be represented. For example, if your warband has 4 infantry based on 20mm squares and 3 cavalry based on 20x40mm rectangles, place 8 20mm squares and 6 20x40mm rectangles. All markers must be placed within 1 X Short distance from the player's baseline or within the terrain feature closest to the defender’s baseline. This lets models hide behind bushes and tress. During play, whenever a marker is attacked, or whenever an opponent moves within 1 X Long from the marker, or whenever the defender rolls to activate it, the defender must reveal whether the marker is real, substituting the marker with a figure, or if just a “dummy”, removing the marker from play. When all the figures are on the table, remove any remaining markers.
Play continues until one player concedes or all models on one side are defeated.
Victory conditions: Defeating the opponent while suffering less than 20% losses is a decisive victory. If both warbands are reduced below 50%, the game is a tie. Any other victory is a marginal victory.


Trapped Under a Mushroom
Choose one of the two bands randomly. As they cross a clearing, a huge mushroom falls on one of the characters (pick one randomly) and traps him under its weight. The character is not hurt, but cannot move. Helping him out is a 5-action task for his friends. A maximum of two characters can help him.
Place the character at the center of the table, putting a model mushroom over the knocked down figure. Place all other characters within 1 x Long of the fallen character.
While they are helping the trapped friend, opponents ambush them and attack. Place four to six bushes, logs or boulders within 1 x Short from the table edges, in a way that there is at least one of these obstacles on every side of the table. The ambushing party can place their models anywhere in contact with these obstacles.
Players then dice for initiative.
The band with the trapped character wins if the character is freed and brought to safety off the table. If they manage to escape with no losses, that’s a decisive victory.
The ambushers win if the ambushed fail in bringing the friend to safety.


Of Truffles and Pillbugs
Place a large truffle at the center of the board, and a Giant Pillbug 1d3 Short sticks from it, in a random direction. Players alternate placing five more scenic items around the table, placing one scenic item at a time until all are placed.
The game is played in three sides: first there is a Pillbug turn, then player A, then player B. Determine who is A and who is B by a normal initiative roll at the beginning of play. Players alternate deploying their models two at a time, beginning with A, until all models are deployed. Models may be placed anywhere along a 1 x Short deep deployment area all around the table sides. No model may be placed closer than 2 x Medium to an enemy model or the Pillbug.
During its turn, the Pillbug will always perform two movement actions in a random direction. If it moves to the edge of the table or comes into contact with an impassable terrain, it stops there. If it comes into contact with a character, it will gain an action and attack that character. If it comes into contact with the truffle, the Pillbug will spend one action to eat a morsel. The Pillbug does not roll any reaction, it just acts on its own turn.
The truffle is composed of 5 morsels. Collecting one morsel is a 1-point task. Unfortunately, the truffle is on an anthill. Any model (including the Pillbug) coming into contact with the truffle will stir a colony of giant ants on the d6 roll of 3 or more (roll once each time the character collects one portion of truffle). The ants will immediately swarm out, attacking a random character within 1 x Short stick. That character must immediately test Morale, using all failures to move towards a body of water, if available, or in a random direction if no water terrain is present on the battlefield. At the end of any turn, if that character did not move at least 2 x Medium, the ants catch up with him and perform a C1 attack. If a character moves into a body of water or through a Wall of Fire or a Wall of Water, the bugs are dispersed. The ants are also dispersed if their target is caught within the blast of a Fireball. If any model moves in contact with the character assailed by the swarm, he will be attacked too — use the same rules. Artificial and Undead models are immune to ant bites and do not test Morale.
The game ends when all the truffle has been collected either by the characters or by the Pillbug, or when both bands leave the board, or the players agree to end the scenario.
Victory Conditions: leaving the table with 5 morsels of truffle is a decisive victory. Leaving the table with any other number and more than the opponent is a minor victory. Any other result is a tie.

The Burning Hut
A family of five halflings is endangered as a sudden fire destroys their hut. Two rival bands meet and start helping them to safety.
Place a hut in the center of the table. Scatter in any agreeable manner 4-6 scenic items around the hut. Players alternate deploying their models, two at a time. Models may be placed anywhere on the board as long as none is closer than 1 x L to the hut or closer than 2 x M from any enemy.
Any time a character within 1xShort of the hut rolls a double 1 on an activation or reaction roll, he receive a C2 attack from the fire.
The two warbands may not attack each other until all the family members are brought to the table edge. However, they may still hinder each other with entangles, spells, and walls, and anything else which is not a direct attack.
The family members are panicking and it takes one action just to convince someone to move out of the hut. The family members need not be represented — just use glass counters. The game ends when all of the halflings have been brought out of the table unless both players agree that they want to fight over bragging rights.
Victory conditions: The winning warband gets a decisive victory if all the halflings are out of the table. If no warband manages to bring all halflings to safety, the warband that saves more halflings scores a minor victory.




Jcrozier
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Re: Scenarios for you to try

Unread postby Jcrozier » Wed Mar 25, 2015 2:06 pm

These look great; I'll try 3 and/or 4 out at the next opportunity.

In a less fungal setting, number 3 would work well with an Old Man Willow-style "evil tree". Faced with a lack of giant mushrooms, I'll be using an old Fantasy Forge (or Grendel?) carnivorous pumpkin, which will have partially swallowed the trapped character.

We've found that "non-player characters" - like the pillbug here - work really well in SOBH. I can't recall if I suggested it earlier, but I think a "wandering monster" chart for the Sun-Kissed Vale would be a great idea (maybe for a free PDF?). Drawing on Daniel Mersey's giant vignette for SAM, we've sometimes used a wandering-monster table with a list of six fearsome creatures (I think last time it was ogre, gorgon, gargoyle, troll, owlbear and griffin). At the end of every turn after the first, a dice is rolled. A 6 results in a creature entering the fray from a randomly determined table edge, drawn by the noise of battle. It activates on three dice and always moves toward the nearest model to attack it. There's no limit to the number of creatures that can appear (though we re-rolled repeats) over the course of a game. It adds an additional tactical element as you try to manoeuvre so that the creatures attack your opponent - or even each other. The latter outcome is a little like one of those Harryhausen films where a cyclops fights a dragon at the climax.

For FiFu, you could include a lot of the big fungal monsters in the table - matanagars of various sorts, swamp lions, eye fungi, etc. And there could be other tables representing different areas or situations. The Gang rule (or similar) makes it easier to have groups of NPCs: small bands of mushroom people who might launch opportunistic attacks on intruders. Using "wandering monsters" would allow players to add a fungal flavour to a game of FiFu, even if they were using more conventional warbands on both sides.

There might even be a marketing angle for the miniatures in this: "The deep forest is a dangerous place. This bundle of mushroom monsters allows you to add an extra deadly dimension to your games ...".

Anyway, just a thought!



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Andrea Sfiligoi
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Re: Scenarios for you to try

Unread postby Andrea Sfiligoi » Wed Mar 25, 2015 2:27 pm

thanks, nice idea. Too bad I do not have space for this in the book, but as you said, could be some PDF supplement added later, or go on Talespinner.



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Re: Scenarios for you to try

Unread postby Abyssal Goblin » Fri Mar 27, 2015 3:40 pm

I'll second @Jcrozier idea for NPCs and wandering monster tables. Especially if its themed with FiFu creatures.




Jcrozier
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Re: Scenarios for you to try

Unread postby Jcrozier » Wed Apr 01, 2015 10:18 pm

My son and I played Trapped Under a Mushroom last night (after distracting my four-year-old daughter, who was determined to join in with a stegosaurus she's been painting ...). I had a band of goblins, consisting of a gang of five spearmen (Q4, C2, Long Reach, Gang) and a gang of five archers (Q4, C2, Short Bow, Gang), a goblin leader (Q3, C3, Heavy Weapon, Leader) and a goblin hero (Q3, C2, Short Bow, Hero). My son had four lizardmen (Q3, C4, Amphibious, Tailslap), a lesser lizardman (Q3, C2, Amphibious, Short Bow), a snakeman archer (Q3, C3, Shooter: Long, Poison) and a dinosaur-rider (Q3, C4, Mounted, Dashing, Trample, Long Move).

My son declared that one of my troops should be trapped (in our case, swallowed by a carnivorous pumpkin - an old Fantasy Forge resin scenic). We decided there was an equal chance of the captive being a personality, an archer or a spearman, and rolled a spearman. We used a sparser table than normal, with just a few patches of ruins scattered around the pumpkin.

The goblin leader directed the two gangs to spread out to screen the hero and a solitary spearman, who were striving to free their friend, from the advancing reptiles. The archers advanced towards the dinosaur-rider, but though they fired numerous shots, the monstrous mount ploughed into their line with a reaction and, thanks to Dashing and Trample, made short work of his first foe (although he missed a gruesome kill on the fallen goblin by a single pip). Meanwhile, a lizardman and the snakeman clambered atop some ruins on the other side of the archers, and the other lizards advanced towards the spearmen.

The goblin hero and spearman had so far failed to rescue their friend. Shortly afterwards, the spearman had to rush off to help his kin engage the first lizardman to reach them. By this point, the goblins had already lost a couple of archers and a spearman. But then their luck turned. A well-placed shot knocked the dinosaur rider down, and the goblin leader was able to rush in and dispatch him. The snakeman and his lizardman companion descended from the ruins to avenge the rider, but were outnumbered by the leader and surviving archers. The initiative shifted once more, and the goblin leader rolled a 6 with a Power Blow, killing one of the lizards.

With their heavy cavalryman gone and their infantry heavily outnumbered, the lizardmen now looked markedly less formidable. To make matters worse, the goblin leader dashed back to join the hero at the pumpkin. Together, they managed to prise open the voracious vegetable and free the trapped goblin. The remaining lizardmen were closing in, but just as the lesser lizardmen aimed a shot (at Short range for the bonus) at one of the goblin archers, he failed one of his activations, allowing his target to loose a 3 vs 2 shot in response. The dice made that 9 vs 3, and a gruesome kill ensued. The snakeman retreated - and was then shot dead by one of the other goblin archers. A mob of spear-armed goblins made short work of another lizardman, leaving just two on the table.

It was then a question of whether the rescued goblin would make it off the table. He set off as fast as his crooked legs would carry him, but a lurking lizardman managed to catch up with him on three longstriding activations. But before he could attack, the goblin hero, leader and another spearman joined the fray. The last of those attacked – and the lizardman was killed.

That left just one – and he was too far off to prevent the rescued goblin from escaping. We played another turn, in which the lizardman was mobbed and killed by the remaining goblins.

Observations
This was a choice victory for goblin-kind against the usually all-conquering lizardmen (high combat and good quality are a killer combination). The Gang rule was a big part in this, as the goblin leader effectively had two or three group activations in the early turns (the two gangs and the pumpkin team could all activate as groups, provided the leader activated at least once, and all three groups enjoyed the leadership bonus as long as he remained close by).

The power of the Short Bow trait is also a great help to goblins, given their low C. With aimed shots and Short range, they were taking on lizardmen as equals (3 vs 3).

The scenario itself was interesting. The presence of a vital task made for a good challenge; unlike the treasure-hunt scenarios, there was little point in trying to fight it out first, as a rout could leave the defending forces too scattered or depleted to release their friend and protect him from the enemy.

One consideration that arose towards the end was what happened if the rescued character routed off the table. Right at the end, a pursuing lizardman was locked in combat with various goblins, including the leader. Had the leader been killed, the resultant morale test would probably have driven almost all the goblins off the table, so close were they to the edge. Would that have counted as an escape? The distinction between running away to escape and routing seems a bit arbitrary in the circumstances.

Another thought that struck me is that perhaps it should be a personality that is trapped. It was a little hard to rationalise the importance of one particular goblin in narrative terms (I couldn’t help thinking of the passage in The Lord of the Rings in which the goblins discuss how they laughed at, and refused to release, one of their comrades who was captured by Shelob!). Perhaps these were unusually kind-hearted goblins. But the stakes might have been higher and the story more satisfactory if one of the warband’s personalities had been trapped.

That would also make the escape from the table more rational. It was hard to justify several mean-spirited goblin spearmen giving up their miserable lives to help one of their own escape, rather than leaving him to his fate, given that he was a goblin of little consequence. But getting a hero or captain or wizard away from the ambushers makes for a less abstract goal. It might also provide more tension in the game, as the released character would be more consequential on the battlefield and thus would be the “cavalry coming over the hill” as well as a victory goal.

That said, it made for a very enjoyable game as it was. All in all, this is a fun scenario with an interesting concept and lots of tactical challenges.



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Andrea Sfiligoi
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Re: Scenarios for you to try

Unread postby Andrea Sfiligoi » Wed Apr 01, 2015 10:27 pm

Thank you for the in depth analysis i was afraid that a Personality being trapped could deprive one warband of too much power for a good portion of the fight.
Maybe the goblin trapped is the one with the keys to the wine/cheese cellar...




Jcrozier
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Re: Scenarios for you to try

Unread postby Jcrozier » Wed Apr 01, 2015 11:37 pm

That must be it! Or a carrying a bag of particularly toxic/intoxicating fungus harvested from the forest at no little effort ...




Jcrozier
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Re: Scenarios for you to try

Unread postby Jcrozier » Thu Apr 02, 2015 5:56 am

Actually, perhaps the set-up to the game might be that a member of the defending warband has been trapped under a mushroom in the process of harvesting some particularly valuable fungus (a rare fungus that grows on other fungi?). That gives a rationale for both his rescue and the importance of his escape. For what it's worth ...




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